The Roaring 20s Giveaway Hop

Welcome to the The Roaring 20s Giveaway Hop,  hosted by The Kids Did It and The Mommy Island.

The term “Roaring 20s” sure conjures up an image, doesn’t it? A carousel of flappers and speakeasies and seemingly endless parties. The “Lost Generation” of Hemingway and Fitzgerald. The generation that came of age during World War I, the war that they thought would end all wars.

The 1920s (and 1930s) were also the “Golden Age of Detective Fiction”, the era of not just Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers, but also Margery Allingham, G.K. Chesterton, Ngaio Marsh, Josephine Tey, Georges Simenon, Ellery Queen, Erle Stanley Gardner and even Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammet. With the addition of Arthur Conan Doyle, who was still alive and still adding to the Sherlock Holmes canon during the 1920s, these are the giants on whose shoulders the modern mystery genre still stands.

The 1920s were years of ferment in so many ways. Looking back, it sometimes seems to have been a never-ending party, at least until the resounding crash of the stock market on October 28-29, 1929. When it all came tumbling down. Hopefully we’ll fare better with our own “Roaring 20s” in the 2020s.

What images come to your mind when you hear the phrase “Roaring 20s”? Answer in the rafflecopter for your chance at either a $10 Amazon Gift Card or a book, up to $10 in value, from the Book Depository.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

And for more “Roaring” prizes, be sure to visit the other stops on this hop!

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116 thoughts on “The Roaring 20s Giveaway Hop

  1. I imagine the great relief felt worldwide at the end of WWI and the wonderful optimism of young people everywhere looking forward.

  2. When I think of the 1920s, I have an image of grainy black-and-white film showing Flappers doing the Charleston. The overriding image of the decade is frivolity. And, of course one can’t forget the Speakeasies and prohibition

  3. The first thing that comes to your mind when I think of the “Roaring 20s” is flappers. Thanks for the giveaway!

  4. The “Lost Generation” began its transformation of American literature.
    In 1920, the “Lost Generation”—expatriate writers who lived in Europe following World War I—became a force in American literature. Among books published in 1920 were Main Street, a skewering of small-town America by Sinclair Lewis; This Side of Paradise, the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald; and Flappers and Philosophers, Fitzgerald’s first collection of short fiction. That year, Fitzgerald also introduced Maxwell Perkins, the famed editor for Scribner’s, to the short stories of Ernest Hemingway, who would go on to some success.
    10. The mass media was born.
    In November 1920, the first commercially-licensed radio station began broadcasting live results of the presidential election. The transmission of breaking news was new and unprecedented, and as word spread of this new medium, the “talking box” exploded in popularity. Two years later, Americans bought 100,000 radios. In 1923, they bought 500,000. By 1926, there were over 700 commercial radio stations, and virtually the entire country was covered by radio signals. As Burns writes, “No other event of 1920 would have more of an effect on the future than the birth of radio, with was in turn the birth of American mass media.”

  5. What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of the “Roaring 20s”?

    The Great Gatsby movie\book

  6. “What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of the “Roaring 20s”?” Sheer dresses with elegant beading!

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